Stone Tools Courtesy of Steve Churchill, Professor, Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, and Courtesy of Dr. Dan Livingston, Professor Emeritus, Duke Department of Biology

Item Description

The prehistoric site near Kalambo Falls along the boundary between Zambia and Tanzania provides one of the longest and richest records of human activity so far recovered on the African continent.

Stone tools found at Kalambo:
Two knife blades made for cutting meat and hides
Three core stones struck with a hammerstone to create various tools with blades
Two Early Stone Age hand axes, made ~300,000 years ago

Courtesy of Dr. Dan Livingston, Professor Emeritus, Duke Department of Biology

Stone tools from various origins:
Two butchery stone tools from Africa made 50,000-250,000 years ago for cutting and cleaning skins
Two spear tips, made 50,000-250,000 years ago to attach to the end of wooden hunting spears
Four weaponry armature from Europe, made 10,000-40,000 years ago
Two replica clovis points from North America, from ~14,000 years ago, would have been used on the tips of spears

Courtesy of Steve Churchill, Professor, Department of Evolutionary Anthropology