Tobaccoland

Moral Opposition, 1870s–1920s

Early anti-tobacco movements portrayed smoking, particularly by boys and young people, as evidence of America’s moral failure. Social reformers pushed for limitations on sales to minors, and partnered with temperance organizations to link cigarettes with delinquency and sloth. The most famous example, by Henry Ford, includes testimonials from famous persons on the societal effects of tobacco use. The movement faded to the margins as cigarette production and use soared during and after World War I.

Moral Opposition, 1870s–1920s

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